We are home to two premier training programs in research and academic general internal medicine. The overall goal of these programs is to prepare general internists to assume faculty and leadership positions in primary medical care, ambulatory care, and occupational and environmental health.

Occupational and Environmental Medicine Residency

The Occupational and Environmental Medicine Residency at the University of Washington is a two-year program that provides physician training in the prevention and management of workplace illness and injuries and promotion of health and productivity of workers and environmental health of individuals and communities. An emphasis is placed on training physicians to serve in leadership roles in the specialty. The overall goal of the program is to provide world-class academic, clinical, and practicum training leading to board certification in occupational medicine.

Most physicians enjoy the OEM training program and subsequent career. According to a national survey, OEM is the medical specialty with the lowest burnout rate and highest satisfaction with work/life balance. Graduates of the OEM program are employed in a variety of settings, including clinics, universities, government agencies, corporations, medical centers, insurance companies, and small consulting businesses.

VA Health Services Research & Development (HRS&D) Post-MD Health Services Research Fellowships

The VA Puget Sound Health Care System (VAPSHCS) Seattle offers two post-MD fellowship training programs funded by the Office of Academic Affiliations—one in ambulatory care and the other in health services research. Both programs operate in conjunction with the Division of General Internal Medicine and the Department of Health Services at the University of Washington. There are two new positions available in each program each year.

The primary focus of both programs is the development of research skills. Participants apply these skills by completing a publishable research project by the end of two years of training. They also enhance their clinical skills in ambulatory care and develop abilities necessary to assume academic faculty positions in medicine or other primary care disciplines. Approximately 15% of the fellows' time is devoted to clinical care.